How bad was it? On a scale of one to ten…

This Big Think article perfectly expresses our ineptitude to remember how painful an experience was. At first hearing this you think NO, I know how bad this was and that day was awwwwwful and don’t even mention last week when… But are we really remembering the pain itself or the event that was painful? For example, last week I had a cold and I was very ill, nauseous, tired, the works. But apart from remembering that I was very ill I can’t remember what it felt like to actually BE ill. This is an interesting concept and the Big Think article begins with the authors account of the pain he went through running a marathon and how he is about to do another one.

The article also discusses Daniel Kahneman’s 2011 book, “Thinking, Fast and Slow,” which has a whole chapter dedicated to human inability to conceptualize and process pain. (I haven’t yet read the book but will be doing so after IB. :D).

http://bigthink.com/praxis/the-upside-of-suffering?utm_source=Big+Think+Weekly+Newsletter+Subscribers&utm_campaign=c48eac05b9-_Here_s_What_s_New_at_Big_Think2_22_2013&utm_medium=email

Memory

The Inquisitive girl

Do you rely on technology to help you remember things? Do you not bother to remember more complicated things as you know you can simply ‘google’ them later? This interesting Big Think article discusses whether technology is hurting our memories and whether we should try to remember more things ourselves. It also relates the topic to our good friend, Sherlock Holmes and what he would do.

http://bigthink.com/big-think-tv/how-to-google-like-sherlock-holmes?utm_source=Big+Think+Weekly+Newsletter+Subscribers&utm_campaign=125e377770-Wed_2_27_Booth_3_sherlock2_27_2013&utm_medium=email

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